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Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters by Gojin Ishihara

rhade-zapan:

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Kappa (river imp)

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Jorōgumo (lit. “whore spider”)

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Kubire-oni (strangler demon)

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Rokurokubi (long-necked woman)

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Onmoraki (bird demon)

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Nekomata (cat monster)

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Tengu (bird-like demon)

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Tenjō-sagari (ceiling dweller)

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Enma Dai-Ō (King of Hell)

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Kyūbi no kitsune (nine-tailed fox)

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Baku (dream-eating chimera)

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Yūrei (ghost)

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Yamasei (mountain sprite)

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Rashōmon no oni (ogre of Rashōmon Gate)

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Waira (mountain-dwelling chimera)

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Nure-onna (snake woman)

(via folk-punk)

fleshandthedevil:





“ Lovers ”       “ Der Verrufene Weiher (The Infamous Pond) ”by Maximilian Liebenwein (1869-1926)

Thank you to xenophone  for posting this spectacular painting!






tumblr_m4lnrvTy4X1qbstkto1_1280  Der Verrufene Weiher (The Infamous Pond) by Maximilian Liebenwein (1869-1926)   xenophone

fleshandthedevil:

“ Lovers ”       “ Der Verrufene Weiher (The Infamous Pond) ”by Maximilian Liebenwein (1869-1926)

Thank you to xenophone  for posting
this spectacular painting!

tumblr_m4lnrvTy4X1qbstkto1_1280  Der Verrufene Weiher (The Infamous Pond) by Maximilian Liebenwein (1869-1926)   xenophone

the-rx:

On April 12, Triple Canopy organized All A Are Not B, a conversation about diagrams with David Joselit, Susanne Leeb, Prudence Peiffer, and Amy Sillman, which considered the role of transitiveness in contemporary painting; the humorous, mimetic diagrams of Ad Reinhardt; how chance operates in the work of Marcel Duchamp; how the circulation and disposition of images affects the way we relate to them; and how diagrams can draw a line between the body and the machine. 
Listen to the podcast here.
Above: Marcel Duchamp, To Be Looked at (from the Other Side of the Glass) with One Eye, Close to, for Almost an Hour, 1918.

the-rx:

On April 12, Triple Canopy organized All A Are Not B, a conversation about diagrams with David Joselit, Susanne Leeb, Prudence Peiffer, and Amy Sillman, which considered the role of transitiveness in contemporary painting; the humorous, mimetic diagrams of Ad Reinhardt; how chance operates in the work of Marcel Duchamp; how the circulation and disposition of images affects the way we relate to them; and how diagrams can draw a line between the body and the machine.

Listen to the podcast here.

Above: Marcel Duchamp, To Be Looked at (from the Other Side of the Glass) with One Eye, Close to, for Almost an Hour, 1918.

(via buddhabrot)